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Condemnation/Eminent domain

How much is your property worth? If the Georgia Department of Transportation (DOT), Georgia Power, a city, a county, or the State decides to take your land in a condemnation process, you are entitled to just compensation, and just compensation almost never describes the first offer from the condemning authority.

Landowner rights: If you are a landowner, if you own commercial, residential, or farm property that the DOT, Georgia Power, or the government needs, be sure to talk to Michael R. Sleister so he can explain your rights.

Condemnation proceedings: When your land or other real property is subject to a condemnation proceeding to make way for other uses (an interstate highway, a power line right-of-way, or other public uses), Michael R. Sleister can help you determine an appropriate response.

Michael R. Sleister has successfully advised and represented hundreds of landowners in condemnation actions against the Department of Transportation, Cities, Counties, and Power Line Companies. You are well advised to consider that the settlement offered to you by the condemning authority is usually substantially less then the fair market value of your property being taken. Many property owners find that hiring an attorney to represent them in a condemnation action results in many thousands of dollars more in recovery for their property, with their attorneys fees being only a small portion of that additional recovery. Examples of such cases are:

  • DOT road widening case where DOT offered $125,000 to the landowner. After Michael R. Sleister was retained, the Department of Transportation raised its offer to $199,000, a $74,000 increase. Michael R. Sleister’s attorneys fees to the landowner were $10,000.
  • Forsyth County road widening case where Forsyth County offered $130,000 to the landowner. After Michael R. Sleister was retained, Forsyth County raised its offer to $200,000, a $70,000 increase. Michael R. Sleister’s attorneys fees to the landowner were $2,500.
  • Georgia Power power line easement case where Georgia Power offered $95,000. After Michael R. Sleister was retained, Georgia Power raised its offer to $250,000, a $155,000 increase. Michael R. Sleister’s attorneys fees to the land owner were $25,000.
  • Oglethorpe Power power line easement case where Oglethorpe Power offered $1,500 to a home owner. After the home owner retained Michael R. Sleister, Oglethorpe Power’s offer was raised to $10,000, an $8,500 increase. Michael R. Sleister’s attorneys fees to the landowner were $2,500.